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Soundwave Therapy


Sound Wave Treatments Can Work Shockingly Well
 

Extra-Corporeal-Shock-Wave-Therapy (ECSWT) is the latest generation of ultrasound therapies to be used in pain and rehabilitation. I have had and used an ECSWT device for over three years on a variety of conditions and I have found it to be surprisingly effective.

 A variety of studies using ECSWT to treat tennis elbow have shown significant effectiveness. Most of the studies using ECSWT on tennis elbow have shown about a 60% success rate after three treatments versus 29% without ECSWT. Similar results have been shown for treating plantar fasciitis after three treatments. The basic mechanism of actions is that the "shock wave" literally strips scar tissue of muscles and tendons that re-heal in a rejuvenated condition. I often explain the mechanism is much like a laser peel used on the face, but internally.

 After three years of experience, I have learned much about the technology. For plantar fasciitis, I typically require five applications (or more) instead of three, and there is a healing phase of 3-12 months post-shock wave that can be required, especially in severe cases. The shock wave is best introduced gradually in most cases, as highest intensity shock wave can cause considerable discomfort, and may delay treatment as you wait for healing. The
 treatment intervals are best at every 1-2 weeks depending on severity.


Soundwave Therapy

Click on this 2 minute movie link for an overview of using

Soundwave Therapy For Pain


I have found that the pain can move, whereby, the worst area of the foot may improve if treatment is only applied to that area, but the rest of the foot may be painful, mainly because it is more noticeable. It is important to include spinal therapy with both plantar fasciitis
 and tennis elbow, as there is often a spinal component to the "tendonitis". Spinal therapy may take place in the form of physiotherapy, chiropractic, spinal injections and/or self-stretching. The addition of nighttime splinting (foot or arm brace) and medications can be helpful such as anti-inflammatories.

 I have found that combination therapy and persistence can be very effective in treating these two tendonopathies. An advanced approach, such as this, can provide recoveries equal to 60% or even higher.

 To learn more about the plantar fasciitis combination-therapy program at the Lamb Pain Clinic or stretching for plantar fasciitis  www.spinalsolutions.ca
 

Injuries are also potentially preventable and reversible with a proper stretching program such as The Lamb ProgramTM.

 Watch for more on injuries on DrLamb.com.

 


                                   

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  Last Updated: September 01, 2014

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